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The most basic thing, or: the table!

Discussion in 'Scenery' started by Varsovian, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. Varsovian

    Varsovian Well-Known Member

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    I need some advice, guys...

    Infinity scenery is very interesting and I'd like to own some - to be able to play Infinity at home. The question is: is it actually possible?

    I mean, Infinity requires quite a big table (4x4 feet). I was wondering, how many of you guys own such a table? Because I don't. The only table at my home is the kitchen table, which is 4 ft x 2,5 ft (more or less). Could Infinity be played comfortably at such a table?

    If not - what can I do to play Infinity at home? I can't buy a real gaming table (both because I can't afford it and because my father, whom I live with, would never agree to put such a thing in our living room). Is there such a thing like, say, something like a gaming mat... but rigid? Something that could be put onto an ordinary table to make it wider - and, after a game, could be dissassembled and stored comfortably in a closet?

    Or should I just give up, because Infinity is meant to be played only at gaming clubs etc.?
     
  2. Balewolf

    Balewolf It's all opinion

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    You can buy Styrofoam sheets or anything else to use as a table topper. I just have a big 4x4 composite board that I put on top of the kitchen table and use 2x2 styrofoam extenders for 40k.

    For 150pt games or recon you can easily do Infinity on a smaller table, and I prefer it that way (I usually use the paper maps that come in the cardboard terrain kits for those games).
     
  3. gorkij

    gorkij Bakunin disciple

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    I've gotten a carpenter-relative to make me a 4x4'-topper and use that on top of two IKEA thingies that're movable. I'll get some pics one of these days. Probably thursday, since that's gaming day if that's OK?
     
  4. itsuncertainwho

    itsuncertainwho Well-Known Member

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    Go to your local home improvement store and grab two pieces of 2' x 4' plywood and a 1" x 2" furring strip. Cut the furring strip to 2' lengths and screw to the bottom of the 2' x 4' sections to create a rail that will sit on either side of your table under the board.

    TableTop.png

    Probably want to glue some felt pads on the boards to protect the table surface. They should store easily in a closet when not in use.

    All together it would probably be less than $40 to make the pair.
     
  5. Alphz

    Alphz Kuang Shi Vet. Retired.

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    I typically see the classic plywood (buy thicker plywood if you live in a somewhat humid area), but with a hinge attached in the middle or 1/3 of the board so it can fold away for easier storage.
     
  6. gru6y

    gru6y Well-Known Member

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    Go to Castorama and ask for OSB. The one I bought also came pre-cut into 125cm x 125cm so pretty much spot on for Infinity table. You can then ask them to cut it in half for you so it is easier to transport and store it. It did not cost more than 50pln. You can then place the board on your regular table and you are good to go! There is plenty of more elaborate solutions, but this is the cheapest. Please, note that the edges are often jagged and splinters come off of it easily so it might be a good idea to at least cover the edges of the board with some tape or foil. If you can't be bothered with that, I think you can also get an OSB that is covered in resin, which makes it a bit more durable and easier to handle.
     
  7. colbrook

    colbrook Black Fryer

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    I use 2 sheets of 2x4' MDF on top of the dining table with a mousepad material mat rolled out over the top.

    When I'm done it all goes back under stairs.
     
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  8. Cannon Fodder

    Cannon Fodder Well-Known Member

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    I also use 2 sheets if mdf with a mat on top. The only difference is I use a rubber mesh under it. They are usually sold at hardware stores to put under rugs so they don't slip. It means the boards won't slide on the table. This reduces the chance of scratching and the boards don't slide when someone is reaching over.
     
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  9. Varsovian

    Varsovian Well-Known Member

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    That would be great!
    Interesting! What would the role of furring strips be? To stop the plywood board from being all over the table?

    That's a great idea, but I suck at such making such things...

    OSB? Hmmmm, what is that? Seriously, I have no clue about construction materials...

    That's my current idea :) I looked up MDF boards on the web and they seem to be pretty cheap. But please tell me - would MDF be rigid enough for significant portions of it to hand in mid-air without bending? I admit I have no idea what MDF actually is?

    Come to think about it, what is HDF..? You can buy HDF boards, too...

    Hm. Googling "rubber mesh"...
     
  10. Alphz

    Alphz Kuang Shi Vet. Retired.

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    MDF = medium density fibre board.
    HDF = high

    typically its board made from wood pulp and glue compressed together. Often it will have an external waterproof veneer (very common on kitchen cabinets here). MDF is very sensitive to moisture.

    If you're worried about rigidity, head down to your local hardware store and look at how much flex each board has. A heavier, denser board will have less flex, but will be heavier. So get the heaviest you can manage.

    In fact, I wouldn't even worry about putting a hinge. Just get 2 2ft x 2ft boards, and buy a mousepad mat to put over it and you're good to go!

    I think when he says "rubber mesh" hes talking about the non-slip rubber mats. Over here they come in rolls and look like criss-crossed strands of rubber laid over each other and pressed together to form a loose mat with holes.
     
  11. Cannon Fodder

    Cannon Fodder Well-Known Member

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    Do an amazon search on "under rug non slip". You'll find a couple options.
     
  12. gru6y

    gru6y Well-Known Member

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    Oriented Strand Board.
    This abbreviation is also known in Poland so feel free to use it in home depot stores when looking for it.
     
  13. descrii

    descrii Well-Known Member

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    I had a 4x4 terrain board that hung on my wall like a piece of art when not in use. It was good in my small apartment. :)
     
  14. colbrook

    colbrook Black Fryer

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    As an aside my old gaming group in the North of England (highly variable, temperature and humidity) store multiple ~10mm MDF sheets in a community centre cupboard no problems, they fit on 6x3' folding tables with no real sagging even when the historical players cover each side in pewter napoleonics.
     
  15. itsuncertainwho

    itsuncertainwho Well-Known Member

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    Holds the boards in place on the table. That way if you bump the board while playing it doesn't slide off sending miniatures and terrain flying.
     
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  16. Varsovian

    Varsovian Well-Known Member

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    Okay, thanks for all the advice!

    Question: which material is heavier, MDF, HDF or OSD? Also, what thickness would you recommend? I've seen 3mm HDF boards, but I'm not sure they are rigid enough not to start bending if weighed with scenery and troopers. Some of Infinity models can be relatively heavy, I think...

    BTW. Any estimates on how much would the contents of an Infinity gaming table weigh? I have a long coffee table at home that might also be useful for gaming (after putting boards on top of it), but its legs aren't too sturdy. I wouldn't want the whole thing to break...

    Regarding the rubber mesh - I googled it and yes, we have these things here. My question is, would it work under a board that's smooth / laminated / laquered? Or does it require rough contact surface to work?
     
  17. Mob of Blondes

    Mob of Blondes Well-Known Member

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    If you have problems with humidity or weight, look for something plastic based, like foamed PVC (sometimes called as their brands: Sintra, Forex, Palight...) or cellular polycarbonate (like lots of tubes glued to each other, so air mostly, but strong... you can use a long rubber loop to keep them joined). Both are used for buildings, booths, ads, so normally avaliable in DIY shops, contruction material warehouses or printer suppliers.
     
  18. Varsovian

    Varsovian Well-Known Member

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    Interesting! Is PVC strong? Any ideas how thick should such a board be?

    BTW. Do you happen to know what is the difference between "foamed PVC" and "hard PVC"? I can see both kinds of PVC boards in online shops...
     
  19. Mob of Blondes

    Mob of Blondes Well-Known Member

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    Foamed PVC has tiny bubbles inside. It's lighter & more flexible because of that, can be marked deeply if you use something like a hammer or your knuckles (you crush the bubbles), edges will have a slight different look than main surfaces. http://www.eisobergsma.nl/en/services/materials says theirs is 0.6 Kg per mm thickness, each m2.

    Hard PVC is solid, and will not mark under medium pressure, it will scratch and crack at some higher point. This one is used for things like pipes in some countries. Weight from above source is 1.4.

    Cellular PC is a bit flexible, and really light, it is two or more thin sheets with some internal structure joining them. Weight above says 1.2, but a 6 mm thick plank can be just two sheets plus the supports, so probably 2.5-3 Kg per m2.

    I would go with whatever you can find cheap, 5-10 mm thick. If you can visit a shop first, better.
     
  20. chromedog

    chromedog Less than significant minion

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    I use 2 2x4 sheets of 12mm mdf that join together (metal pins) on top of my dining table. I have a tablecloth and one of those rubberised non-slip protector sheets on top of the table and all my terrain goes into 55l or so plastic tubs (with lockable lids). It all packs away in the shed when not in use. There's a third section that I can add to make it a 6x4' table (if I had a long enough dining table) or just to vary the road pattern.

    You can use 3mm mdf/had, but it will probably need a rigid frame of battens under it. 6mm likewise. 9mm+ gets into the self rigid enough areas.
    My next one will be 6mm with a road network marked out on it (which will be made up of a 3mm layer with the non-road bits - the road itself will sit recessed).
     
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